From 22 April 2013: Jay Leiderman on HuffPostLive discussing the Matthew Keys case

Jay Leiderman
By: Jay Leiderman
December 02 2016

22 April 2013

Jay Leiderman on HuffPostLive

Jay Leiderman

AP Story

 Reuters editor charged with hacking: I was fired

A Reuters deputy social media editor accused of conspiring with hackers to deface a story on a news website says he has been fired.

His dismissal came the day before 26-year-old Matthew Keys was scheduled to appear in US federal court for the first time on the felony charges. His attorneys said he plans to plead not guilty.

 Jay Leiderman

US federal prosecutors allege Keys provided the hacking group Anonymous with login information to access the computer system of The Tribune, the parent company of The Los Angeles Times.

According to a federal indictment handed down last month, a hacker identified only as “Sharpie” used information Keys supplied in an internet chat room to alter a headline on a December 2010 Los Angeles Times story to reference another hacking group.

Tribune also owns a Sacramento television station Keys had been fired from months earlier.

Keys has said he did not commit the crimes he’s accused of. He did not immediately respond to a telephone message seeking comment, but he did post several online messages saying Reuters had not fired him as a result of the indictment.

“Just got off the phone. Reuters has fired me, effective today. Our union will be filing a grievance. More soon,” he tweeted to his more than 35,000 followers.

 Jay Leiderman

He later tweeted a copy of a “final written warning” he said he received from Reuters in October, which admonished Keys for mocking a Google executive from a fake Twitter account he had created, saying the action demonstrated a “serious lapse of judgement and professionalism that is unbecoming of a Reuters journalist”.

His attorney Jay Leiderman confirmed the firing, but said he would not comment on it because the Newspaper Guild was representing him on the matter. He added that “there is an appeals process that I will have to let play out”.

The Guild did not immediately return a phone message seeking additional details.

Reuters hired Keys in 2012 and suspended him from his New York social media job on March 14. Thomson Reuters spokesman David Girardin declined to elaborate on why Keys was no longer employed.

Keys is scheduled to be arraigned on Tuesday (US time) in federal court in Sacramento. He is charged with one count each of conspiracy to transmit information to damage a protected computer, as well as transmitting and attempting to transmit that information.

If convicted and sentenced to the maximum for each count, the Secaucus, New Jersey, resident faces a combined 25 years prison and a $US500,000 fine, prosecutors say. But experts say first-time offenders with no criminal history typically spend much less time in prison than the maximum term.

7 thoughts on “From 22 April 2013: Jay Leiderman on HuffPostLive discussing the Matthew Keys case

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